Alumni

Recognizing and reporting signs of terrorism can help prevent attacks

Technology has played a large role in the growth of terrorism through recruitment of terrorists worldwide or through cyberattacks on critical infrastructure. Jordan Clark (’11) trains people to recognize warning signs of possible terrorist or criminal acts on social media and in other settings through the Community Awareness Program at the CELL in Denver, Colo.

How We Do Data in the City of Kansas City

Eric Roche (B.A. ’11) has a C-level job at a city that many people have never heard of: Chief Data Officer. Roche’s job is to uncover data that is valuable in decision making, and empower the city’s staff and leadership to make quick, data-informed decisions resulting in employees that are more efficient at their jobs and residents get better services delivered.

Building Maps of the Past with New Technologies

Robert Ower (’18) uses the research skills from history classes to build maps and create ‘mappable data’ for high tech industries. Ower’s path from work to college to a meaningful career reflects the maps that he makes with ArcGIS. Layers of skills, research, patience, effort and luck are the mappable data. His emerging career is a world of his own creation.

Arts Management in the Digital Age

Arts Management programs began in the 1970s, following the establishment of the National Endowment for the Arts in 1965, which stressed the need for leaders in the arts. Since then, technological advances have led to improvements in understanding and building audience engagement and navigating the necessity of marketing for artists in the 21st century.

Winter 2018

Working toward water resource sustainability

Jake Adler, political science graduate, is at a fellowship with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education at the EPA’s Office of Water working on issues of resource recovery, water monitoring, innovation, and reuse. Adler’s team’s research and work focuses on the whole water cycle and follows the One Water concept, thinking more broadly about the entire water cycle, in a collaborative manner, to work toward water resource sustainability.

Walking Up Stream: sleeping rough on the banks of the South Platte River

Chris Conner (M.A. ’11) has spent the majority of his career working to improve the lives of those experiencing homelessness in Denver. Inspired by the rhetorical traditions of his communication studies degree, Conner recently helped one man share an unlikely story of living and sleeping rough on the banks of the South Platte River.

Water lessons from the Syrian Civil War

For millenia, water scarcity and security has caused both wars and international cooperation. But with increasing populations, precipitation changes due to climate change, and unbalanced resource allocation, water issues are becoming more and more relevant to global stability. Case in point: the Syrian civil war. CSU alumnus David Bonomo provides a look into the issue.