Students

Drone-captured protest art about social inequality in the Choice City

Fort Collins is often called the “Choice City,” but for whom? In Dr. Josh Sbicca’s Social Movements course, students are asked to look at the social inequalities in Fort Collins and create protest art as a result. By using drones to capture images, sounds, and voices and editing software to create meaning, tell a story, and call for social change, students are using technology to take a new look at the Choice City.

The Sound of Technology

While recorded sound was the ‘first big thing’ as far as technology’s impact on music, everything from the synthesizer to the computer and composition software has had an impact on how music is composed, created, and shared. Modern technologies in the classroom and in the performance halls at the University Center for the Arts allow music students and music patrons to experience state-of-the-art music performances.

Technology provides new ways to teach languages and cultures

In an increasingly connected global society, fluency in a second language is an important skill in both the job market and for the cognitive benefits reaped by the language learner. Through technology and increased access to authentic language materials such as manuscripts, music, film, and video, students have greater opportunities to access many learning styles and engage with a language and culture more creatively and deeply.

Technology’s Hand in Interdisciplinary Studies

We are living in a tech age that grants us access to more information than ever before, but we can also find ourselves overwhelmed by that very same material. A major in interdisciplinary liberal arts helps students see the connection between all of the information they absorb and a type of systems thinking that guides interdisciplinary work, teaching students how to manage the flow of information and find connections where none before existed.

Winter 2018

Unusual Spanish connection brings together the humanities and sciences

A mutual friend, a beer, and a river — all in Spain, 5,000 miles from Colorado — have brought together two CSU faculty members from very different fields, as well as a couple of their students. Jonathan Carlyon, who teaches Spanish language, literature, and culture, and Steve Fassnacht, who teaches watershed science, have come together to provide a comprehensive look at the history and environment of the Camino de Santiago in Spain.

Sharing the Lessons Learned during the 2013 Colorado Flood

What can a historian do in response to life-threatening flooding like we’ve seen in Northern Colorado? Quite a lot it turns out. By documenting the communication, cooperation, and activity of  disaster responders, historians capture the knowledge and information-sharing process that is so crucial to future response and recovery.

Water takes center stage in CSU Theatre’s latest production

Big Love by Charles Mee has been called a big, beautiful, fantastic mess. Just like love, or perhaps like water. Water plays a major role in the on-stage dynamic, and the key to success is collaboration between the multiple theatrical shops. From the set designer to the technical director, all members of CSU’s Theatre worked together to make the production a success (and not a mess!)