Research & Creative

Navigating the Complex Terrain of Life

Health isn’t solely the purview of hard science. Politics, economics, rhetoric, art, and history all provide essential perspectives on what it means to be healthy. This issue gives a liberal arts perspective on health.

Mapping People and the Environment

Students in the course Geography of Global Health had a unique opportunity to study the global health lesson of the COVID-19 pandemic as it unfolded across the world in Spring 2020Learning about inequalities, vulnerabilities, and human-environment relations that shape the disease dynamics, outbreaks, and incidence taught students to investigate the social and systemic interactions of the virus. 

The Health, Strength, and Vitality of a Democracy

Can a democracy be healthy or unhealthy? Political science professors weigh in on how democracies are created and the work required to maintain them. 

Winter 2019/Spring 2020

The visual arts evolution at CSU

The evolution of Colorado State University’s Art and Art History department is tied to the space it is housed in. At first, art classes were held in Old Main and all across campus. But since 1974, the Visual Arts building has housed all disciplines from art history to printmaking to electronic art. The painted cinderblock functions as a blank canvas for students, faculty, and staff to create art and is a place to work, learn, create, collaborate, and grow.

Spring 2019

A liberal arts lens: technology’s role in society past, present, and future 

We’re aware of the role technology plays in shaping our individual lives, but how does technology affect and influence our society and our future? The specific skills and tools unique to the liberal arts can provide understanding as well as a way to navigate the ways technology does (or doesn’t) advance the human experience.

This Content Is Not Available in Your Country (Yet)

Getting locked out can happen not just from your car or your home. Getting locked out can happen online when you’re not able to view certain films or media. Geoblocking, or regional lockout, is a way that media distribution companies protect their films. While we may think that the internet and other technologies have created a global village, media distribution practices and other uses of technology have prevented that global interconnection.

Winter 2018

Should I Stay or Should I Go? How people make decisions about disasters

When a disaster threatens, how do people decide whether to stay or to evacuate? To rebuild or relocate? How to restore their lives? Prof. Kate Browne’s work with survivors of Hurricane Harvey explores the decisions people make using a novel “assemblage” technique.